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Places » Queen Elizabeth National Park

About Queen Elizabeth National Park

If you visit Uganda’s national parks, the first thing that will capture your attention as you drive through is the undulating hills and steep valleys. The escarpments, gorges, the plain savannah grasslands that are low lying as well as the forests that are covered by bushes and shrubs and many other types of vegetation. At Tides, we’re certain that this will make your drives interesting and enjoyable.

Major Activities

Big Game Drive

With an astonishing 5000 hippos, 2500 elephants and over 10,000 buffalo thriving in its grasslands and shorelines, QENP guarantees sightings of some of Africa’s most iconic species. Hearing the elephants’ calls reverberate around Queen’s crater-filled valleys is a magical experience. Other common herbivores include warthogs, waterbuck, Uganda kob and topi, as well as the sitatunga antelope. Your drive in one of Uganda’s natural endowment parks will be interesting and exciting!

Primate walks

Have fun and joy by trekking the ten species of primates while they enjoy the park's diverse habitats, the most popular of which is undoubtedly the chimpanzee. Vervet and black-and-white colobus monkeys are easily spotted in the trees, but the boldest of all are the baboons – be sure to keep car windows closed to avoid food thefts!

Birding

Birding in Queen Elizabeth National Park is an incredible treat as it contains a variety of habitats that range from savannah to wetlands to lowland forests. This diversity is reflected in the list of over 600 bird species, the biggest of any protected area in East Africa. A majority of the birds found in this area are regarded as famous birds of East Africa and are a must see for birdwatchers in the world!.

Big Cats

Queen’s most elusive inhabitants are its felines: lion, leopard, civet, genal and serval cats. Lions are found throughout the park, but the most renowned live in the southern sector of Ishasha, where they rest on the limbs of fig trees. Solitary leopards are nocturnal and fiendishly well camouflaged, making a glimpse all the more rewarding! The smaller cats are also predominantly nocturnal and best spotted on night game drives.

Areas of interest

Lake George

The papyrus swamps of this Ramsar wetland site are home to the semi-aquatic sitatunga antelope. One can spot the elusive Shoebill plus other native birds on the lake.

Explosion Craters

The 72 huge round basins scattered across the equator are evidence of the Albertine Rift’s bubbling volcanic past, and are a must-see for those with a particular interest in the region's fascinating geological history. The 27km drive between Kabatoro gate and Queen’s Pavilion takes in views of the enormous craters, circular lakes, the Rift Valley escarpment and the Kazinga channel - all in front of the mighty backdrop of the Rwenzori Mountains.

Katwe

This is one of the most famous lookout points in Uganda is in the Katwe-Kabatoro community on Katwe Salt Lake where traditional salt mining has been practiced since the 16th century. The neighbouring Lake Munyanyange is a bird sanctuary, as well as a migratory location for the lesser flamingo from August to November.